Reminiscing About What Watoga Offers — Our Readers’ Turn

You too can reminisce about this spectactular sunrise at Watoga when you return home. 📸: Brian Hirt, September 3, 2017.
You too can reminisce about this spectacular sunrise at Watoga when you return home.
📸: Brian Hirt, September 3, 2017.

Reminiscing has a way of putting things into perspective, especially during a pandemic.

With the pool closed and Labor Day in the rearview mirror, it’s time for readers’ perspective of their times at Watoga State Park.

Childhood Reminiscing

Where do I start? Watoga was my adolescence. It’s the place a significant number of my memories begin and where I grew up.

The pool was my place of refuge where I went to get away. We would either walk ourselves or bum a ride to make it there, but we made sure to get there every day before it opened and stayed until closing. We would gather together to round up our money to make sure we had enough to get in and some extra money for the vending machines.

As kids we always found ways to make the day even more exciting than the day before. Back then, the pool didn’t have the solar panels to warm it, so the water was always freezing. But that didn’t matter to us. We made a game of who would jump in first and who would be the first to chicken out.

Spending Everyday There

We spent every day of our childhood there. Even when it was raining and storming we still went; it didn’t matter to us if we weren’t allowed to swim. It gave us an excuse to hang out in the Rec Room and play numerous games of life and listen to the “Funky Cold Medina” or “Wild Thing” over and over on the old jukebox.

Every day brought a new adventure and every day we became avid swimmers. We learned to hold our breath longer and swim a little harder which was a great accomplishment as a child. Even when my best friend passed away during my 8th grade year of middle school, and we all grew up and went our own ways, the memories we made at Watoga will always hold a special place in my heart. And the stories I can tell will always keep those memories alive. So, it’s the place we created relationships of best friends and grew as children.

Alyssa Hall, 1997-2003

Reminiscing as a Former Employee

If you look at the window on the second story of the building [at the swimming pool], you’ll notice it has a curtain in it. That section of the building was actually a dormitory for the male summer workers at Watoga. The lifeguards and utility workers were housed there.

Moreover, I spent two wonderful summers there in the early 60s. What fun we had. The female workers were quartered over the dining room in the Administration Building. They were waitresses in the dining room. About 10 total summer employees. Great group. Fun times.

Gary Mitchell Hershman

Reminiscing About What Watoga Offers

Love, love Watoga! Beautiful place to spend time. So peaceful and lots of wildlife.

Pat Drake

Recalling the Cold

When mom asked if we were cold [after swimming], we always said, “No,” through chattering teeth!

Mary Beth Norman

Every 4th of July swimming in that cold, cold swimming pool and the best ever picnic with juicy watermelon as desert! Fond memories.

Judy Brown Cooksey

Refreshing! Not Cold!

I worked there in 1957 through the early 60s. I don’t remember the water being that cold. We were there most days between serving lunch and dinner. I know we sunbathed, but I just don’t remember the issue being that the water was too cold. Those were wonderful times. I lived at home and went to college so Watoga was my coming of age time.

Susan Higginbotham

I worked at Watoga 1956 thru 1959 and also lived at Watoga as a child while my father was superintendent so I am very familiar with the Watoga pool. I called it refreshing.

Charlotte McKeever Emswiler

Cabin 20 Reminiscing

My family rented the cabin next door years ago. Great vacation. We went several times.

Sharon Cecil

Talk About Something “Near and Dear to my Heart”

I lived there for one summer, either 1984 or 1985. Two college students lived over the pool building, and every Wednesday night was poker night. Me and two other girls lived over top of the restaurant, and worked there during the day. So Watoga was ours for one summer. Best summer ever! Lots of great memories.

That summer was the year of my first job, my first apartment on my own. . . . I was so young, 19, with all my life ahead of me. I explored every inch of that park and hiked every trail that summer, but you could usually find me floating in the lake on a paddle boat, reading a book.

The grandeur of the Milky Way as seen on a clear night at Watoga Lake. 📸: Jesse Thornton.
The grandeur of the Milky Way as seen on a clear night at Watoga Lake.
📸: Jesse Thornton.

Later, I would bring all my children back to that park, and all of them learned to swim in that pool.

So Watoga State Park, has always been near and dear to my heart. My children grew up visiting this beautiful place. Listening to me tell them all about nature, the trails, the CCC camp builders. We all love this park!

Cherie Williams Hall

Hark Back to the Future?

Like going back in time.

David Price

About the Author

John C. Dean is a former journalist who grew up at Watoga State Park. His father, Vernon, worked at Watoga for 43 years. John is a freelance editor and can be reached at jcamerondean@gmail.com.

Watoga Dark Sky Good for Bats

Watoga dark sky good for bats. Cindy Sandeno, District Ranger of the Marlinton/White Sulphur Springs Ranger District, visited Watoga State Park this past Saturday evening to teach an assembled group of campers, park employees and other interested parties why we need bats, and why they now need us. Sandeno discussed light pollution and how bats and humans can benefit by installing downlight fixtures.

Cindy Sandeno discusses bat house with workshop participants at Watoga State Park, a would be Dark Sky Park

Cindy, whose background includes managing regionally threatened, endangered, and sensitive species for the Forest Service spoke about the diminishing population of bats throughout the country and the profound effects that spell for the environment and agriculture.

As the National Cave and Karst Coordinator for the Forest Service, and her experience spelunking in the U.S. and Mexico, she has a deep appreciation for the plight of these fascinating creatures who silently do so much for us.

It’s a thankless job being a bat when you consider that most people still regard them as they did in the Middle Ages; as vermin of the night whose only purpose is to spread disease and worse. Many associate bats with witches and vampires, and as creepy creatures who enjoy becoming entangled in our hair – not a problem for me, of course.

In truth, bats are pollinators, they are distributors of seeds, and they are estimated to save $3.7 to $53 billion dollars per year as non-toxic pest control agents. And, if you take the time to learn about bats, you will learn that they are wonderful parents of their young and, all in all, bats are quite cute.

Watoga Dark Sky Good for Bats

Many bat species are threatened by diseases such as White Nose Syndrome that is responsible for the death of 5.7 million bats since 2006. On top of that, much of their habitat is at threat due to light pollution. Watoga State Park is a candidate Dark Sky Park and is a favorable bat habitat.

But you can help save these beneficial critters just educating yourself, friends, and family members about bats. Bat Week is designated from October 24th to the 31st every year.

I was definitely motivated by Cindy’s presentation; so much so that I decided to build a bat house.

A great way to learn more about bats is to visit the Project EduBat at https://batslive.pwnet.org/edubat/