Watoga Trail Report February 17, 2018: Opinions About Logging Watoga State Park

The NW section of Honey Bee Trail was littered with limbs from yesterday afternoon winds. There is one tree down on this section requiring a chainsaw, but is an easy step-over.  Opinions about logging Watoga State Park.

Here are some of the comments from the folks who use and love Watoga State Park.  It is clear they do not want to see this wonderful park logged.

Opinions About Logging Watoga State Park

“What a shame.  Before long we will have no mountains.  We are known for our mountains.  It all comes down to the all mighty dollar!””

“Nothing is sacred any longer, it’s all about money.  So sad”

” I hope our legislature rethinks this terrible proposal to log in Watoga.  I have posted about my long connection and affection for Watoga and hope it continues to be protected and respected for time unlimited.”

” We had a wonderful week hiking the beautiful trails that are right out your front door when you stay in one of their cabins.  We hiked over 50 miles this week by combining different trails to form loop trails and were in many areas of the park.  The beauty of nature is quite evident when you are deep in the woods and have a feeling of peace and contentment like no other!  To even consider logging in this beautiful park is so wrong!!  Watoga State Park should be maintained as it was created for people to get back one with nature.  Once that is destroyed it can never be recreated.  Logging should never be permitted in Watoga or any state park!!!”

Happy Hiking,

Ken Springer

Why Watoga State Park Should Be Spared from Logging

Why Watoga State Park should be spared from logging.  Speaking as an individual who has a fair amount of familiarity and interest in Watoga State Park, I see the logging of the park as contrary to the intentions of its design and conception nearly 80 years ago.   As a volunteer trail worker I have tread every foot of the 40 plus miles of trail here many times over.  I am often deeply moved by the wisdom of those who saw the unique qualities of this park so many years ago and recognized the need to protect and preserve it for future generations.

Monongaseneka Overlook of Greenbrier River Feb, 2018One only has to walk out Ann Bailey Trail to once again marvel at the peace and tranquility that these old growth forests and meadows provide.  The Arboretum, dedicated in 1938, was intentionally built as an “outdoor laboratory”.  Those who venture out on her trails can learn about the many species of trees, plants and shrubs found within the park.  At least one area of the park hosts one of the rarest orchids in North America, the Small Whorled Pogonia.  It is so decimated it is considered an endangered and protected species.

An Appeal for the Beauty of Nature

I am not an anti-logging proponent by any means.  As a former park ranger I recognize that logging is a necessary industry here in West Virginia.  I know when done properly it can be a sustainable and environmentally friendly industry.  But what I am appealing to now has far more to do with preserving a relatively small area of forest for reasons that have nothing to do with money.  Rather, it has everything to do with respect for history and the wisdom to keep some areas of great beauty sacrosanct just because it is the right thing to do.
I know that I am not alone in this sentiment.  I hear this from the people who come to Watoga year after year.

Some families have been visiting the park for several generations.  When asked why,  they most eagerly tell you it has to do with the atmosphere of the park.  Some call it a sense of wilderness.  Just yesterday I talked with Carlene and Jon Cox of Parkersburg who stay in one of Watoga’s cabins several times a year.  They pass several state parks on their drive down to Watoga.  And when you ask them why they do not hesitate to explain that it is the quality and length of the trails here.  Such sentiments speak loudly to what has been preserved in this one park.

Experience of Rock Run

I, like many folks I know, came here on a visit and ended up moving here.  Why? In my case it was my first visit. I came here to camp and hike.  My first morning here I put on my hiking boots an d started up Jesse’s Cove.  I was awed by its beauty.  Rock Run tumbling from one pool to the next; columbines and Christmas ferns hanging from moss covered cliffs and this wonderful path that ascended the stream flanked by steep hillsides clad with towering trees.  I have heard other people compare such places to entering a vast cathedral.  I felt it that day.  And I still feel to this very day.  So much so I made this area my home.

Conclusion

Yes, Watoga State Park offers these kinds of experiences because it is truly unique, one of a kind.  Don’t we have an obligation to protect these kinds of places that do so much for the soul.  To do so is truly an act of wisdom and demonstrates the very best of humanity.  A masterpiece is always better left untouched.

Watoga Trail Report February 13, 2018:

First a big Thanks to Carlene and Jon Cox for reporting trail conditions on the trails that they are hiking at Watoga this week.  Watoga trail report.

I returned to Bear Pen Trail today and removed smaller diameter trees on Bear Pen up to North Boundary and one on North Boundary.  There is one tree on North Boundary that will require a ” lift of the kilt ” to get over.  This and the one on Buck and Doe will be cut with a chainsaw ASAP.

I had plenty of time to consider why I feel so strongly about Watoga State Park on my recent drive back from Florida.  Why am I so attached to this one geographic location on the entire globe?  After all,  I sold my log home on Summerville lake and moved right across the river from Watoga, and that after only one visit .

 

Musings of  Former Natural Resources Officer

It is not like it was the first park I had ever seen. I was a DNR officer in Ohio for many years.  I worked and lived in a great number of parks, including the Cuyahoga Valley National Park.  There is something truly special about this park.  Although some reasons are emotional and I do not have the words to adequately express these, the more objective things include its history, the phenomenal natural beauty here, the wonderful and dedicated people who work in the park, and the friendly and simpatico people who visit the park over and over.

I hope that over the next several trail reports you will be so kind as to indulge me in expressing these things.  I will make my case for why this park is so special and why we need to make every effort to love and protect this park. If we do this, the generations that follow us can enjoy this same affection and serenity we find when we cross the Greenbrier River and enter Watoga State Park.

Thanks and Happy Hiking,

Ken