Welcome to Watoga!

We have great places to stay and great places to play!  Welcome to Watoga!

Reserve Cabin

Hope you can be here a few minutes.  Get to know us a little.  We have the most return visitors of any West Virginia State Park.  Come see us soon!

Stay at  Watoga

Check out what people say about our cabins  and our campgrounds

If you are looking for a hiking wilderness adventure, check this one out

Something a little more tame?

We have a kids friendly swimming pool and great playgrounds.  Paddle boats on the lake.  Amazing mountaintop overlooks.  Best soft serve ice cream in the universe at Jack Horner’s Corner in Seebert.   Beautiful mountain valley around nearby Hillsboro, WV.

Experience Watoga’s old growth forest!

Watoga State Park is 10,000 acres.  The southwestern section of the Park is unmaintained Wilderness.  Hike the Burnside Ridge Trail to access this area.  Allow yourself several hours to get out and back.  Further south from this area is the Spice Run Wilderness Area of the Monongahela National Forest.

Become a Friend of Watoga Now!

Monongaseneka Overlook of Greenbrier River Feb, 2018
Overlook of Greenbrier River from Monongaseneka Trail

Read Ken Springer’s articles here on trail conditions, park history, and natural history.

If you have questions, be sure to contact us.

 



 

 

 

Watoga Update November 4, 2019

Current Happenings in and around Watoga State Park via Watoga Update November 4, 2019

The Riverside Campground sits empty now, the gate was closed last week for the 2019 camping season. Riverside will reopen as it does every spring, on April 1, 2020. It is now a winter sanctuary for dog-walkers and beavers that can be seen cruising the shores along the campground.

The Beaver Creek Campground will stay open until December 8, primarily to accommodate deer hunters. It will reopen the Friday before Memorial Day weekend 2020.

Ten of the Classic cabins will remain open throughout the winter months for the hardier Watoga visitors. Cabins remaining open are 3,8,9,14,15,16,18,19,28, and 33.

Volunteerism at work in Watoga
For the 15th year in a row, the members of the DC Taekwondo group came up to Watoga State Park for training purposes. (It’s top secret and I cannot tell you. Remember, they are from D.C.)

They always spend a day doing volunteer work in the park. When asked why they provide this wonderful service, their leader, Brian Wright, said: “We enjoy our visits so much that we want to give back to the park.”

This year they played the role of Sherpas and carried on their backs pieces of one of two benches to go into the Arboretum. The first bench donated by the Wade Family was assembled by the group at the trailhead and the other, donated by the Watoga Crossing Homeowner’s Association, went into the farther recesses of the park on Honey Bee Trail.

These are the first benches to be built in the Arboretum since the Civilian Conservation Corps hand-built 17 chestnut and stone benches in the 1930s.

David Elliott, acting as the base camp manager, did a splendid job of organizing this effort. He outfitted six external frame packs, spreading the disassembled park bench into near-equal weights, and attached them to the packs.

A huge thanks to the seven members of the Washington D.C. Taekwondo Group, David Elliott, and last but not least, Freia, the amazing pack dog who toted the water for the crew up the mountain.

Pi R Squared?, No, Pie Are Round
At least the ones made at the Hillsboro Library yesterday when 22 students showed up to learn the art of pie-making from Emily Sullivan. I do not use the word “art” loosely; cooking can be an art that takes years and a certain skill set to master and Emily possesses those traits in addition to being an engaging instructor.

Emily Sullivan Art of Pie Making workshop at Hillsboro Library community room.

Under her tutelage, we all made personal size apple pies that we walked away with after class. It was a ‘start from scratch’ course beginning with the most difficult task of making the pie dough. In my humble opinion the crust makes the pie, we learned all of Emily’s secrets yesterday, on pie crusts that is!

Fun was had by all and we started right away planning our next cooking class at the Hillsboro Library. Generally, there is no charge for the class so that’s a big plus. And classes are open to the general public including guests at Watoga State Park.

Stay tuned for information about future cooking classes at the Hillsboro Library.

Dirt Bean To Move One Block Over

Those visitors to our local state parks, including the Greenbrier River Trail, should note that the Dirt Bean has closed its doors at the 812 3rd Avenue location and will reopen in the new location on 2nd Avenue almost directly behind the old location.

The following photo of the owner, Kristy Lanier, was taken just hours before closing the door for the last time at this location. The new store will have the same great coffee, foods and drinks and should be open in the second week of November, if

Kristy Lanier, proprietor of Dirtbean Cafe & Bike Shop Marlinton, WV

Well, that’s it for this edition of the Watoga Update. Watoga State Park is open 365 days a year and there is always something to do in the largest and best state park in the mountain state of West Virginia.

Ken Springer
ken49bon@gmail.com

Dark Sky Park – Watoga

Background

The very first time I saw the Devil’s Tower in Wyoming, it was from a distance of 12 miles and approximately 11 hours before I would start the climb to its summit. It rises straight up out of the pine-clad hills, an ostentatious imposition on a terrain that abhors any vertical challenge to its otherwise gentle rolling landscape.

I had pulled my truck off the gravel road that headed straight as an arrow to the basaltic monolith that I would get to know much more intimately upon the next daybreak. I was leaning against my vehicle focusing my binoculars on the great rock when a pickup pulled alongside and a middle-aged man in a Stetson asked in a friendly way if I was lost or broke down. “Neither”, I said, “I am just a bit awestruck by its size.” I did not mention the jitters I was feeling about climbing its dead-vertical face by way of a continuous 2 inch crack on the next day.

He told me that he was a rancher in the area and I commented something to the effect that it would be cool to be able to see such a beautiful landmark every day. He replied, “Well, you would think so, wouldn’t you? but to be honest I go years without really looking at it.” That statement has always stayed with me because I was to learn that his ambivalence is often the rule rather than the exception. We humans sometimes forget to see the beauty around us; it starts to blend in with the surroundings: But only if we allow it to.

Louise McNeill

Our own Poet Laureate of West Virginia, Louise McNeill, never succumbed to the irresolute when it came to her awareness of the beautiful surroundings here in Pocahontas County, particularly the total darkness of the night sky. She often speaks to the exceptional brilliance and multitude of the stars here in this part of the Appalachians.

Referring to the Aurora Borealis of 1941 in The Milkweed Ladies she recounts that “We ran out into the yard and looked up over us. The whole round of the heavens was beginning to quiver with a wild, flickering crown, at first from the north; then the east and south and west joined, and the green-red-blue-gold-purple spear tent was streaming up to the point of the heavens and riving as it came.”

“As I stood there, a kind of awe and fear came to me, as though God had not yet unloosed his might. But he had it, held back somewhere in the banked fires of the Worlds.”

A recent study revealed that 80% of the population in the U.S. are unable to see the Milky Way at night due to light pollution. Most of us here in Pocahontas County have the good fortune of being able to share the joy of Louise McNeill in having a nearly unobstructed view of the nighttime heavens.

However, we should not take this for granted – light pollution is slowly but surely encroaching upon the few remaining ‘dark sky’ regions, not only worldwide, but more particularly here in the eastern part of our country. Pocahontas County is responding to this dilemma by taking the necessary steps to protect and preserve the dark skies for future generations.

Dark Sky Park

Recently Watoga State Park entered into the initial stages of a program administered through the International Dark-Sky Association that will have many potential benefits for our area. The Watoga State Park Foundation, in partnership with the Pocahontas County Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, has begun the preliminary steps to getting the park designated as a Dark Sky Park.

Watoga Lake under a starry sky

Mary Dawson and Louanne Fatora, board members of the Watoga State Park Foundation, are spearheading the effort to obtain the dark sky status for the park. They both reiterated that this project is still in the very early stages and that it may take up to two years to obtain the dark sky designation.

Meanwhile, preliminary measurements taken by local astronomers have shown that one of the major requirements seem to be met – the Milky Way can be seen with the naked eye. (Louise McNeill could have told them that) Additionally, measurements are required to be taken on a quarterly basis to determine if the visibility requirements exist year-round.

Also required for Dark Sky status is an inventory of light sources within the park, and if necessary they must be shielded. Interpretive programs for park visitors and the general public is required, which will complement the already excellent naturalist’s program at Watoga.

Stargazing

Benefits are numerous, an obvious one being the draw of amateur astronomers and their families to the park and to other parts of Pocahontas County. Anyone who has observed the annual Perseids Meteor Shower from the Scenic Highway knows what a breathtaking display that it provides. This will be a definite boon to tourism.

Less immediate benefits will include the preservation of another of the steadily decreasing number of locations that can justly be called Dark Sky areas. As education about the alarming loss of these areas spread, sources of light pollution such as towns will be more likely to adopt plans that attenuate pollution, furthering the preservation effort.

We have nothing to lose and much to gain in this project. It is hoped that the entire county will respond in a positive manner to preserving the things that those before us marveled at.

I cannot help but think that Louise McNeill, were she still living on her farm near Buckeye, would be overjoyed and supportive of the notion that we have a duty and the will to protect those things of creation that we hold dear.

I will close this edition of the Watoga Trail Report with one of Louise’s poems from her book of poetry, Hill Daughter.

The night will come, though not the “sable” night,

Though not the dark, not the “wished for balm,” the still……

But deathly brightness, thermo-neutron night,

Until some star mad watcher on a hill,

Across galaxies will peer and cry

That where there was once nothing in the sky,

Now there is flame beyond the southward horn

A small, new planet, risen fully born

In one wild surge of green and glowing birth,

And looking at it, he will name it

EARTH.

From the mountain trails of Watoga,

Ken Springer

Watoga Memorial Bench with Plaque

The Watoga State Park Foundation has available a Watoga memorial bench with plaque. The bench is durable and high quality. Also, it includes a memorial plaque and is made in the USA.

You can memorialize a loved one with a minimum donation of $500. Watoga will place the bench in a mutually agreed location on the Park’s 40 miles of hiking trails, scenic overlooks or historic sites.

Watoga Memorial Park Bench

The beautiful bench, made of 100% recycled plastic, should last many lifetimes. Besides that, this exciting opportunity to memorialize your loved ones will fund an important amenity for the Park.

To order a bench, go to the donation page and make your minimum $500 donation. To detail the memorial plaque, go to the contact page and include the details in you message.

For further information, contact Watoga State Park Foundation Treasurer Mac Gray at 304 653-4373

Most importantly, order your Watoga memorial bench with plaque now!

Let’s Talk Snakes

Let’s Talk Snakes

Brian Hirt, one of Watoga’s volunteer trail workers had already put a full morning’s work into the Arboretum on Sunday, May 19. Then he decided to finish out the day by continuing his trail marking project on the Allegheny Trail. He had marked several miles of trail when he ran out of trail markers. So he turned around and started back to his car deciding to clear as much debris off of the trail as possible on his return trip.

At one point he reached down, grabbing a large branch, and started to give it a tug when he heard the distinctive and unmistakable sound of a rattlesnake that was hiding under the branch. The rattler did not strike at Brian, nor did Brian provoke the snake, he just walked away. This story has a good ending for both man and snake because Brian did the proper thing when encountering a venomous snake

Copperhead snake
Copperhead Snake Agkistrodon contortrix

We humans seem hard-wired to react to snakes and even something that merely resembles a snake. I remember reading an article in a science magazine about a controlled study in which the subjects were exposed to a series of images on a screen, while an fMRI (Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging) was measuring their brain activity based on blood flow. When body patterns of venomous snakes were shown there was increased blood flow to the amygdala initiating the Fight or Flight Response.

I can relate to this when I remember being startled enough to jump back recently by nothing more than a long, curving section of grapevine lying across the trail. I had reacted physically before my conscious mind confirmed that it was not a snake.

Roy Moose Snakes of West Virginia

Those of you who have attended Roy Moose’s snake program at the Cranberry Mountain Nature Center know that Roy’s level of engagement with the audience is exceptional. He captures the complete attention of adults and children alike. It is somewhat humorous to watch Roy hold forth a garter snake to youngsters who lean forward to accept the snake as the parents simultaneously lean back away from the snake.

Roy Moose Snakes of West Virginia at Cranberry Mountain Nature Center

Roy’s ever-popular Snakes of West Virginia reveals many facts and misconceptions about the two poisonous snakes found in this region; copperheads and timber rattlesnakes. Roy has been bitten by both species of snake which are pit-vipers. He said that the hand that was bitten swelled up over five times the size of his other hand. And he added that if you are bitten by a poisonous snake you will know it immediately. The pain is horrendous.

He stressed that neither poisonous snake is aggressive; both are exceedingly shy by nature and most people who are bitten were attempting to kill the snake. The best thing to do when you encounter a copperhead or rattlesnake is just to walk away. The strike zone from a coiled position is only half the length of the body. And they can only cover ground at a maximum of five miles per hour so most people could easily outrun a rattler or copperhead.

According to the WVDNR publication Snakes of West Virginia, no one has been killed by a copperhead bite in West Virginia for over 30 years. As for fatalities from rattlesnake bites, from 1969 through 1992 only four people were killed by rattlesnake bites in our state. During the same time period over 15 times more fatalities occurred from bee stings, cows and horses.

Dr. Jennifer Shreves, an emergency room doctor, at the Pocahontas Memorial Hospital, assured me that the facility has a protocol in place for snake bites and anti-venom on hand.

Dr. Shreves emphasized that victims should not bring in the offending snake. Their treatment will be based upon evaluation once they have arrived at the emergency room. This will include a blood test for toxins as the venom from both species of snake are hemotoxins as opposed to neurotoxins.

I asked Dr. Shreves about hikers and trail workers who may be some distance from help. If the victim is alone they should walk slowly back to the nearest help, trying not to get their heart beating any faster than necessary. If the victim has a car nearby they should drive only as far as necessary to get help. If in the company of other people it would be ideal to carry him or her out, however, given the type of terrain in our area that would be extremely difficult at best.

As one ER doctor with experience in treating snakebites puts it, “The most important first aid equipment for a venomous snake bite is a set of car keys.”

As for the toxin, over half of the bites are “dry” bites, meaning that the venom sac is empty. After a copperhead or rattlesnake bites its prey it takes approximately a month to replenish the supply of the toxin. As a side note, if you are bitten you better have good health care insurance; the average cost of an anti-venom treatment is $30,000. It is always better to exhibit smart behavior around snakes than getting treated for a bite.

It wasn’t that awfully long ago that the universal method of treating a bite from a poisonous snake was to simply cut a large X across the wound and suck the venom out, then spitting it on the ground.

With that in mind, I beg your patience in allowing me to share with you a once common tale told around campfires. And in the sort of bars that have singing plastic bass mounted on the wall. And, generally by men.

Humorous Anecdote

As the story goes two friends, Charley and Sam were hiking a section of the Appalachian Trail in the Smokies when Charley took off his pack and headed off into the woods telling Sam he had to go to the bathroom. Charley had just dropped trow and sat down on a log when he felt an excruciating pain that made him howl in agony. Sam yelled, “You OK Charley?” Charley replied, “I’ve been snake bit.”

When Sam got to Charley he asked him where he was bitten; Charley told him that a rattlesnake had bitten him squarely on his derriere. (please note that he actually used another less delicate word to describe that particular area of his anatomy). Charley instructed Sam to run to the little town they hiked through less than a mile back the trail and find a doctor. When Sam got to the town he managed to find a small doctor’s office manned by an elderly doctor. Sam told the doctor that his buddy had been bitten by a rattlesnake about a mile down the trail.

The doctor said, “Where was your friend bitten?” Sam told him the bite was right on his behind. (Sam also used an entirely different word in describing the exact location of the injury). The Doc replied, “Listen, you have to run back as fast as you can and suck all of the venom out of that wound if you want to save your buddy.”

Sam departed immediately and headed back at a fast run. Upon his arrival, Charley was lying upon the ground on his side. In a desperate voice inquired, “What did the doctor say?” To which Sam replied, “He said you’re gonna die.”

With that, I leave you with one more very important thing to do if you see a timber rattler. Please do not harm it. Rather, report it on the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources Rattle Snake Report site. Your participation in this survey will help DNR in managing the timber rattlesnake in the Mountain State.

Happy Hiking,

Ken Springer

1. A special thanks to Dr. Jennifer Shreves and Dr. Michael Jarosick, both ER docs who generously shared information on current treatment modalities for venomous snake bites.

2. Photo of timber rattlesnake courtesy of Rosanna Springston. U.S. Forest Service.

3. Photo of Roy Moose frighteningly close to a rattlesnake, courtesy of me from a safe distance using a telephoto lens.

Tales From a Watoga Naturalist

Jim Meads, Professor Emeritus, Glenville State College, was Park Naturalist at Watoga in 1967 and 1968. Here are Jim’s stories from his time at Watoga.

Background

Judy and I have been married 52 years this July, 2019. Watoga State Park is such a special place for us. We started our wonderful life together here. In June of 1967, I was hired as a seasonal naturalist for Watoga. I was going into my Senior year in the fall at Glenville State College majoring in Biology and Chemistry. Richard Dale (wife Verna) was the Superintendent and Dale Crouser (wife Gwen) was the Assistant Superintendent. Their kindness will never be forgotten. The precusors to Tales from a Watoga Naturalist.

We were married in Parkersburg on July 2, 1967. My lovely wife was a city gal with not much experience in the world of nature. She never had an indoor pet except for a goldfish. Our plan was to leave for Watoga after our wedding in Parkersburg hauling a small Scottie trailer behind. I should tell you that in the trailer was a poodle given to us as a wedding present. No, never buy a pet for someone else. I also had an injured red tailed hawk, a bag of snakes, and an assortment of amphibians. Our plan was to live in the trailer at the Beaver Creek Campground.

Hawk Head

I need to stop here and explain the injured red tail hawk. He was discovered before our wedding on the road going from Seebert. We named the hawk, Garth, and Garth took up residence in the trees at our Beaver Creek Campground location. I fed him bluegill. If I wore my green park uniform, I could call his name and he would fly down and perch on my head. I had a scabby scalp that summer. Garth got into trouble when a camper was grilling hamburgers. Garth eyed the juicy meat, swooped down, and flew away with his catch.

I then moved him to the lake by the Administration building to keep him out of trouble. He was always a welcome addition to my nature lectures by the lake. When I called his name he would appear, land on my head, and amaze the park visitors. I had to laugh when one day a fisherman appeared in the office complaining that “the damn eagle had swooped down and grabbed the bass he had just hooked”. I knew it was no eagle but just an opportunistic red tailed hawk. Good ending to this story. Garth found a bride and I am hoping many Garth descendants are around Watoga.

As we entered the park through Seebert, along Island Lick Run, the rhododendrons were in full bloom. Judy told me later that, as we traveled the road toward the Administration Building, she was wondering if she could ever find her way out of that vast wilderness.

Accommodations

We setup our camper beside the Beaver Creek Campground’s bath house and lived there for a couple of weeks. Mr. Dale realized our accommodations were a little cramped and asked if we would like to move to a large room over the restaurant in the Administration Building, which was built in the mid 1930’s by the Civilian Conservation Corp. Most of the logs and lumber used in the construction was salvaged from blight-killed American Chestnut. Judy was excited to live in the large room with a bathroom on the side.

Mr. Dale gave us access to the storage shed and we found an electric hot plate and a table. We were now ready to live in our new abode. Judy was a trooper. She adapted to the camel crickets that shared our shower. Only two appliances could be used at a time, she realized. Otherwise we would pop the breakers losing power not only to our room but the restaurant beneath us. We did have the luxury of an electric skillet, crock pot, and coffee pot.

Cricket Tales from a Watoga Naturalist.

I loved it when we first moved in to the room and Judy heard tiny squeaks coming from the windows. She said that it is so nice to hear the chirping of baby birds. It was not until we were leaving for the summer that I confessed that those bird sounds were actually bats resting in the cracks of the windows.

I had such a wonderful experience working as naturalist at the Park. I would help with Monday check-ins of cabin guests. We would always plan a marshmallow roast up by the Recreation Hall each week. I learned early on the horrors of flying burning marshmallows launched by the kids of cabin guests. The Rec Hall is where we would show a 16 mm Disney nature classic. Who can forget “Bear Country” or “Squeak the Squirrel”? Tales from a Watoga Naturalist.

Usually after cabin check-ins we would have one cabin complain about finding bats in the cabin. There was no way they were going to believe that this was part of the park experience. I would don my superman suit (green park attire) and arrive at their cabin with a large container of bat repellent spray. Actually it was plain ole water and I would liberally spray the rafters. It worked almost 100% of the time. Plain water equals no bats.

Field Trip Tales from a Watoga Naturalist.

I would schedule motor field trips to Cranberry Glades. Oh, the memories of leading a tour to Big Glade and getting my direction confused in the alder thickets. There was a memorable time where we had several Mennonite ladies hiking through the sphagnum bogs. With their long dresses and buckle shoes, a person would think that it would make the trek difficult. They hiked better than I did. We scheduled trips to Bear Town before it officially became a state park. This unique natural area was finally purchased in 1970 with funds from the Nature Conservancy and a donation from Edwin G. Polan.

I shared Watoga’s unique animal and plant life with Park guests. I collected beautiful Timber Rattlesnakes from an old wood pile located at the end of the old airport runway at Beaver Creek. They were beautiful reptiles indeed. Tales from a Watoga Naturalist.

We always had a botany hike along the trail by the lake. As I was pretty good at plant identification, I learned a technique to use if one of the plants stumped me. “ I am not certain of the proper name of that plant but the locals call it….”. and would make up an Appalachian sounding name. However, that identification technique could not be used more than twice during one field trip! As I was diligently working, my good wife and Gwen Crouser would walk to Watoga Lake and put two reclining lounges in a row boat so they could sun bathe. A beaver tail slap beside the boat often greeted them.

Pre-Riverside Campground Tales from a Watoga Naturalist.

It was such an exciting time for us. Before the construction of Riverside, newest campground, we parked at Cabin Three, a great large cabin that tragically burned. We would hike along the Greenbrier River and enjoy the wonders that we encountered. I recall one evening that we packed our supper. We hauled a coffee pot and large container of water to a waterfall. Sadly, after transporting the heavy items, we discovered we had forgotten the coffee! Tales from a Watoga Naturalist.

It was on this trip that my good city wife had a scary experience. Going around a wet area in the path, she decided to take a detour. She stepped on a pile of limbs and quickly realized she had fallen into a beaver’s lodge up to her hips. Judy thought that the beavers would chew her legs off. I pulled her out and explained that beavers were herbivores and she had nothing to worry about.

Watoga memories continue to be a part of the fabric of our lives -from a night search for a lost cabin guest on Honeymoon Trail to collecting ancient coral fossils at nearby Calvin Price State Forest. As we get older, we realize the importance of life stories and feel so blessed to have Watoga as an amazing part of our story.

Jim Meads, Glenville State College Professor Emeritus of Biology

Wild Edibles Festival

The 2019 Wild Edibles Festival is Coming Soon to a State Park Near You

Watoga State Park Naturalist, Chris Bartley, is visibly excited about this year’s Wild Edibles Festival. When I stopped at the park headquarters to talk to him last Thursday, he started off our conversation discussing the major, and likely better, changes to the format of the event. “Instead of scheduled classes this year, we are trying an ‘open forum’ approach. The downside to having people sign up for classes when other classes are being conducted simultaneously is that people have to choose between presentations. Often they are forced to miss other classes they would like to attend. With this change, people can move from demonstration to demonstration and have a full experience. “

Naturalist Chris Bartley, Watoga State Park

Chris said this year’s wild edibles festival event will be held at the picnic shelter.T This spacious area allows attendees to visit demonstrations on various aspects of gathering and utilizing wild edibles, including herbal and medicinal uses. Additionally, several naturalists from other state parks will be on hand to conduct guided wild edible walks.

This year’s Wild Edibles Festival kicks off at 3 PM on Friday, May 3 with a guided foraging hike around Watoga Lake. Those interested should assemble at the Activities Building, bring water, wear closed-toe shoes and clothing appropriate for the weather and water.

At 7 PM Friday Geo Derick, Keynote Speaker, will discuss Wild Medicine: The Art and the Science. Geo is a Registered Clinical Herbalist and is the founding owner, practitioner, and formulator of Geo Joys. Geo enjoys formulating custom medicines for clients that are both good tasting and therapeutic. She is no stranger to our Wild Edibles Festival. And her presentations are always well attended and popular. This presentation takes place in the Activities Building near the pool.

Activities commence at 10 AM Saturday until approximately 4 PM. Visit the many vendors, demonstrations and guided walks throughout the day, all focused on wild foods, drink, and medicines. Sample wild foods. Garlic mustard pesto, ramp pickles and chili will be available. Live music is provided by Sugar Run. Watoga Wild Edibles Festival is fun and educational!

For more information on the Wild Edibles Festival contact Christopher Bartley at (304) 799- 4087 or via email at Chris.R.Bartley@wv.gov or Contact Watoga Foundation.

A Short History of Foraging for Wild Foods

Photo of local (Pocahontas County, WV) wild edibles

The number of people who must forage for their daily sustenance decreases every year. However, some can still be found in some remote areas such as the Amazon River Basin. Agriculture, in existence for about 10,000 years, has replaced virtually all hunting and gathering societies. With the exception of sport hunting and fishing, the knowledge and skills required to procure wild foods and medicines are in danger of being lost in the industrialized world. However, on Native American lands and in Appalachia people have always consumed seasonal plants, berries, nuts, and mushrooms found in nature.

Euell Gibbons came to public attention in 1962 when he wrote best-seller, “Stalking the Wild Asparagus” It is often regarded as the classic of foraging guides. Six more books of the same or similar genre. Mr. Gibbons books were well timed for the “Back to Earth” movement of the ’60s and ’70s. They are appreciated by the growing number of people interested in foraging for wild foods.

Euell Gibbons was also known as spokesman for Post Grape Nuts during this period. His commercials would often start with “Ever eat a pine tree?” “Many parts are edible.” The commercials ended with “the taste of Post Grape Nuts reminds me of wild hickory nuts.” You can see some of these old commercials on YouTube., as well as many funny parodies of Euell. In on he is eating a bowl of Grape Nuts and pauses to say “Of course I don’t usually eat it (Grape Nuts) out of a bowl like this, usually I just eat it out of my shoe. Sometimes I just eat my shoe…”

In the last decade or so there has been a resurgence of interest in collecting wild foods. Some aspects of this pastime have become trendy. Afew years ago upscale restaurants offered such dishes as nettle salad, causing a rush on nettle foraging. Too bad it wasn’t the invasive garlic mustard. Even the term ‘foraging’ has been replaced by ‘wildcrafting’ in many circles. Pocahontas County is thankfully not one of them.

But on the whole the revived interest in wild foods has been a good thing. Bringing attention to environmental concerns such as the damage perpetrated by invasive species, and getting people off their couches and into the outdoors are positive developments. Books on the subject of foraging have become more sophisticated through the years, offering delicious and healthy recipes. An improvement of the standby method of the ’60s which directed foragers to boil everything and then drench it in butter.

Speaking of recipes for wild foods, I set out on a trail last week with the intention of harvesting a handful of ramps and a mess of wintercress, also called creasy greens. I unexpectedly stumbled upon an old apple tree that had a dozen or so morels circling it. On my way back home I gave thought to how I might prepare this trio of wild delicacies.

Wild Edibles dinner from the bounty of Pocahontas County, WV

Dinner that evening consisted of sautéed ramps and creasy greens with roasted walnuts topped with a drizzle of balsamic vinegar reduction. The delicious greens sat alongside a morel po-boy with homemade aioli. This sumptuous plate was paired with a Dogfish Head Watermelon IPA.

That sounded a lot like foodie-speak, didn’t it?

Sorry, I meant to say that I fried up those shrooms and slid em into a bun with a slather of mayo. Then I boiled up those greens, put a stick of butter on em, and washed it all down with a Miller Lite.

Happy Hiking and Foraging,

Ken Springer

Wind Rain Stay on the Job

Ken is out west (Ohio) for a few weeks, scouting places to come back from, and I miss his daily reports on trail conditions. Wind rain stay on the job. Though he’s taking time off, the rain has been on the job soaking the soil, the winds have blown, and the mercury has been jumping up and down in the thermometer, so things have kept happening in the woods. Today I went out to take a look at the vicinity of the Beaver Creek Campground. Starting from the Allegheny Trail crossing on the Beaver Creek Road and heading south on the trail toward the airstrip there was just the usual light smattering of branches on the trail, with one exception. Temps were still in the twenties, so wet spots were more likely to be icy, and thus easier to cross.

Large White Pine across the 5K Trail at Watoga State Park

5K Race Route

Once I got to the airstrip, I picked up the 5K race route. What a beautiful 2 mile hike it is! (It needs the connection from the start/finish at the campground and the partial loop of the airstrip to make a full 5K.) There were branches on the trail in the usual places and some larger blowdowns, each indicated by a red X on this map – nothing that a band of senior citizens armed with chain saws can’t deal with. Runners in the last 3 Mountain Trail Challenge 5Ks (they keep coming back) may be happy to learn that Nimble Alley retains its charm. I have thought of replacing “What-did-I-get-myself-into Hill” with a gentler short ascent to the ridge, probably named “Why-didn’t-we-go-this-way-last-year Hill”, but it’s not likely to happen soon. Maybe for the 5th annual Mountain Trail Challenge in 2020.

Topo map of the 5K Trail route Watoga State Park

I was afraid the stones underfoot would be uncomfortable, but, honest, I didn’t feel a thing, … and for a while afterward, too.

While we walked back down the airstrip a great blue heron came out of the woods near the creek and flew down the road ahead of us for a bit. A minute later it swooped up out of a tree and coasted across the airstrip.

Ken has a tough job patrolling these trails. With him away, we’ve just got to step up and fill in as best we can. Wind rain stay on the job.

2019 Special Events at Watoga State Park


Green Day Hike

Saturday, March 16. Be sure to wear your green for this 2019 Special Event at Watoga State Park. And join us at 10:00am at the parking lot just a half mile above Cabin 2 along Island Lick Road as we venture along Monongaseneka Trail. Along the way, we will discover the different shades of green, whether it is with grasses, mosses, flowers, or any other
plant. Once we reach the top, while we may not see the pot of gold, the view is breathtaking, as it will allow you to see the town of Seebert. We will also have some green goodies awaiting the arrival to the top of this hike. Please dress accordingly for this hike, and make sure to bring water. This hike is an intermediate level, and has some steep inclines. Round trip on this hike is 4 miles.


Gold Rush

Saturday, April 6

Calling all anglers! The waters are set to run gold on April 6 at Watoga State Park Lake. This is a fishy 2019 Watoga Special Event! There will be a very special stocking this date, where golden rainbow trout will be the only fish stocked, but will be the same capacity as a regular stocking. Be sure to come to the park early so that you can catch one of these beauties and make memories!

Quilter’s Retreat with Debbie Walker

Thursday, April 11–Saturday, April 13

Enjoy fellowship with other quilters of all experience levels at this quilter 2019 Watoga Special Event. This three day retreat will give you hands-on experience and advice from one of the best. Space is limited for this retreat. For more information on specific workshops, please contact Debbie Walker at (304) 653-4150. To reserve your spot for this weekend, please contact Christopher Bartley at Watoga at (304) 799-4087.

Stitchin’ Across West Virginia

Friday, April 26 – Sunday 28

Enjoy a weekend of playing with yarn, friends, and the great outdoors with the Kanawha City Yarn Company. Activities for the weekend include campfire cookery, an owl walk, hiking, yoga, and eating and hanging out with others wild about yarn. A class in tapestry weaving has also been scheduled and each person will go home with their own unique wall hanging. No prior knowledge or experience is necessary. Registration for the retreat should be done through Kanawha City Yarn Company by April 2 at (304) 926-8589. To make cabin reservations, please contact Watoga State Park at (304) 799-4087.

Wild Edibles Festival

Friday, May 3 – Saturday, May 4

Join us for a taste of the wild! Our event will begin on Friday evening with a hike around the lake at 3:00pm, followed by a presentation by Key Note Speaker, Georganne Derick at 7:00pm. Saturday festivities will occur at the Picnic Shelter area starting at 10:00am with various vendors, demonstrations, live music, opportunities to hike, and much more!

B.A.R.K. in the Park

Saturday, May 11

Bring your dogs, and enjoy the beauty that Watoga has to offer. This day is dedicated to your furry friends as we will embark on a short hike and learn how to become better stewards of the outdoors with our pets. Meet us at 10:00am by the boat dock near the main office to take a beautiful walk around the lake. Total distance is 1.5 miles and perfect for all ages. Please dressing accordingly, and be sure to bring water and snacks for yourself and your dogs.

Kid’s Fishing Derby

Saturday, May 18

Youth under 15 can enjoy this special day and go fishing on the lake during our annual fishing derby. Be sure to meet us between 9:00am and 10:00am to register. The derby itself will last from 10:00am – 12:00pm with prizes and certificates given out shortly afterwards. Join us for what is sure to be a great day of fishing, fellowship, and fun.

National Trails Day

Saturday, June 1

Explore Watoga State Park and see what trails it has to offer! Home to over 40 miles of hiking trail; meet us at 10:00am at the Ann Bailey trailhead parking lot, just beyond the T.M. Cheek Overlook. We will explore the Ann Bailey Watchtower, as well as the Workman Cabin. Total distance is 5 miles, and is great for all ages. Please dress accordingly, bring your water, and wear closed toe shoes.

Casting Call! Learn How to Fish

Saturday, June 8

For those who have wanted to learn how to fish, but never knew where to start, look no further. Bret Preston will be leading this workshop, and is open to all ages who have never been fishing, and will allow you to try it out for free. For more information, or to reserve your spot, call Christopher Bartley at the park office at (304) 799-4087.

History ALIVE with Mark Twain

Saturday, June 22

Join us as history comes to life when the famed author who wrote “The Adventures of
Huckleberry Finn” and “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer”, Mark Twain makes his way to
Watoga. He was also involved many other aspects of life, and will be at our Activities Building at 7:00pm to share with everyone.

History ALIVE with Theodore Roosevelt

Friday, June 28

Enjoy a history lesson from our 26 th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt, who served from 1901 – 1909. Roosevelt was an avid conservationist, writer, and was also an American statesperson. Join us in the Activities Building at 7:00pm as we discover what his life was like, and to see living history!

History ALIVE with Benjamin Franklin

Friday, July 5

What better way to celebrate the Independence Day weekend, than with one of our Founding Fathers? Join us as we host Benjamin Franklin in the Activities Building at 7:00pm. A truly remarkable man, Franklin will share some of his life stories with us. This is a program you do not want to miss.

History ALIVE with Ostenaco

Friday, July 19

Join us by the Campfire Ring at Riverside Campground at 7:00pm as we bring history to life with the Native American leader, Ostenaco. Ostenaco was crucial in the settlement of current West Virginia. You do not want to miss some of this living history. In the event of rain, the presentation will take place in the Activities Building.

Mountain Trails Challenge

Saturday, August 10

Trail running – it’s a challenge. Two different races, a 5K run and a Half Marathon both begin at 8:30am from the Beaver Creek Campground. Event is sponsored by the Watoga State Park Foundation. For more information, or to register to race, please visit the website www.watogafoundation.org/race

Watoga Art in the Park

Saturday, August 31 – Sunday, September 1

Held at the Picnic Shelter area, this festival has something for all ages. Join us to participate in various demonstrations, workshops, purchase art, listen to live music, and so much more! Festival will go on from 9:00am – 5:00pm on both days.

Disc Golf Tournament

Saturday, September 7

Enjoy the cooler air and participate in our first ever disc golf tournament. There is no entry fee, and registration will begin at 9:00am, with the tournament beginning at 10:00am and going until all participants have played. You can participate either individually, or in pairs. Door prizes will be given out shortly afterwards.

Halloween in the Campground

Friday, October 25 – Saturday, October 26

Participate and enjoy a spooky good time at Watoga as we celebrate Halloween in Riverside Campground. This event will have several activities throughout the weekend, including movies, night hike, pumpkin decorating contest, Trick-or-Treating in the campground, and much more!

Watoga Winter Bird Count

Saturday, December 7

With the annual Christmas Bird count conducted by the National Audubon Society just around the corner, join us to perform our own bird count within the park for the day. This event is great for all ages and levels of expertise. Learn how to use binoculars and field guides, as well as bird habitat and food preferences each species has in the area. Meet at the Activities Building at 8:00am.

Pine Run Cabin Area Trails

Today’s trail-work was concentrated on the Pine Run Cabin Area Trails. Two of the classic cabins are open in the winter months.  Consequently, I have noticed that the robust folks who rent these cabins, at this time of year, are often hikers.

Pine Run Hiker Advantages


Subsequently, those staying in this area have access to a great number of trails without having to drive anywhere.  Pine Run, Honeymoon, and TM Cheek trails all have trail-heads in the Pine Run Cabin Area. These trails also junction with trails that lead towards the Beaver Creek area, TM Cheek Overlook and the trails around Watoga Lake.

An old blaze on an oak tree on the Allegheny Trail – one that opens up the tree to damaging insects and fungus. Today a single yellow blaze marks the length of the Allegheny Trail, which I am sure the trees appreciate.

So today we cleaned up the Allegheny Trail to Honeymoon Trail.  Meanwhile, after traipsing through the cabin area, continued clearing the Recreation and Laurel Trails. There are several trees down on these sections of trail.  They will be cut with a chainsaw in the near future.

I find winter hiking to be enjoyable and possessing a beauty of its own. The lack of canopy opens up views that are hidden in the warmer months.  As well, fewer people are on the trails so there is a greater sense of solitude.

Beauty of Solid Water

Plus, when water transitions from liquid to solid, the keen eye spots unique and ephemeral sculptures that may very well be seen by “your eyes only.” Something created just for you ! And you can’t beat that.

A light snow on the banks and dock of Watoga Lake. Soon the lake will freeze bringing joy to the ice fisherman who return every year like the swallows to Capistrano.

Take a winter hike my friends,

Ken Springer

Halloween in the Campground October 26 & 27, 2018

Join us for a spooky good time as we celebrate Halloween in the Campground October 26 & 27, 2018  in Watoga’s Riverside Campground. This is your chance to decorate your campsite and become the winner of our Halloween in the Campground Decorating Contest.  Even more, everyone can take part in the trick-or-treat!  Even those not staying in the campground are encouraged to participate in all activities including the trick or trunk or treat!  Therefore, mMake sure you stop by campsite 15 on Saturday and see local residents Dustin and Devan Simmons, as they demonstrate how to make apple butter. You will also have a chance to help if you choose.  There will also be samples for you to take home while they last.

Friday October 26

6PM Movie in the Campground: Charlie Brown and the Great Pumpkin

Bring a lawn chair or something else to sit on and join us at the Riverside Campground as we watch the family friendly movie “Charlie Brown and the Great Pumpkin.”

7 PM Movie in the Campground: Ghostbusters

Meet us for our second movie of the evening, as we watch the classic movie “Ghostbusters” on our inflatable screen. Be sure to bring something to sit on. Snacks will be provided.

9 PM Glow Walk

Light the sky with glow sticke Watoga Halloween in the Campground 2018What better way to celebrate Halloween than with a Night Hike. We will hike to the light of glow sticks! Bring you glow sticks and join us by the check in station to help us light up the sky as we walk around the campground. Be sure to wear closed to shoes.

Saturday October 27

11 AM Campfire Cookery

Join us for some fun and fellowship at Riverside Campground behind the check-in station. Bring a lawn chair or blanket to sit on as we cook up some goodies in a Dutch oven over a campfire. All ages are welcome. Samples of the pumpkin cobbler available!

2PM Pumpkin Carving and Decorating

Carve a jack-o-lantern at Watoga Halloween in the Campground 2018Bring a pumpkin, have some fun with art and decorate your pumpkin with paint or by carving. We will provide carving tools and paint. Parents/guardians are asked to assist children in any way possible as they need. Pumpkins can then be taken back to be used for the evening activities.

5PM Halloween Costume Contest

Open to youth up to age 14, our Costume Contest will begin at the Gorup Campsite at the lower lot of Riverside. Prizes will be given to the best costumes as determined by our judges.

6PM Trick or Trunk or Treat

This activity is open to anyone young at heart who would like to participate whether camping, staying in a cabin or local to the area. If you are planning to hand out candy, please arrive at Riverside Campground between 4:30 and 5:30 pm. Once there, you will be given instructions as to where to park. We look forward to everyone partipating!

7:30 PM Ghost Stories, Spooky Tales, and S’mores

What would Halloween be without being able to hear some spooky ghost stories? Bring a lawn chair, a blanket, or something else to sit on. Come join us by the fire ring in the campground to listen to some ghost stories told by story tellers Cully McCurdy and Bugs Stover. Afterwards we will have the makings for s’mores!